Watertown, Mass., April 18, 2011 – Measuring the body temperatures of newborns with temporal artery thermometry (forehead scanning) provides readings comparable to results obtained by axillary (under arm) thermometry, the clinically recommended method for this patient population, but causes less discomfort, according to a new study reported in Advances in Neonatal Care.

The study[1], the first published clinical analysis evaluating the accuracy of temporal artery thermometry in neonates, compared the accuracy of temporal artery and axillary temperature readings as well as the discomfort level of newborns while obtaining the temperature readings. The sample included stable, mostly normothermic newborns with a gestational age between 32 and 40 weeks at birth hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).  Rectal thermometry was used as the reference.

Researchers noted that axillary temperatures measured with an electronic thermometer probe are difficult to obtain without disturbing newborns, such disturbances causing increased respiratory and heart rates and lower oxygen saturation.  During the study, measurements taken using temporal artery thermometry resulted in a statistically significant improvement in comfort scores.

An excerpt from the published study confirms this: “Neonates experienced less discomfort with the temporal artery thermometer than with the axillary thermometer method.”  In addition, the authors stated: “The statistical equivalency of the temporal artery and axillary temperatures, coupled with less discomfort to the neonate during temporal artery device use, makes the temporal artery thermometer an attractive alternative for temperature monitoring in neonates.”

“This independent research validates our findings about the usefulness of temporal artery thermometry,” said Francesco Pompei, Ph.D., CEO of Exergen Corp. “Exergen’s patented TemporalScanner™ Thermometer was developed in response to healthcare providers’ and caregivers’ at home need for a gentle, noninvasive, and accurate method of thermometry for all ages, from newborns to geriatrics.”

The clinical research, which used an infra-red electronic temperature device made by Exergen Corp., was conducted at a level IIIa NICU in a not-for-profit hospital in the Western United States. It showed body temperature readings taken at the temporal artery and the clinically recommended under the arm method were similarly accurate when compared to rectal thermometry. The amount of deviation from the reference readings was within the standard set for noninvasive temperature measurement.

The study was not affiliated with Exergen and neither the authors nor the institution received compensation from the company to conduct the research.

Exergen markets two models of the TemporalScanner thermometer: a professional version for doctors’ offices and hospitals, and a consumer model sold in major retailers including Wal-Mart, Target, Walgreen’s, Costco, Sam’s Club, Babies “R” Us, Toys “R” Us, and BJ’s. More than 800 million temperatures are taken each year with the TemporalScanner. Used in thousands of hospitals, clinics, and pediatricians’ offices in the country as well as in millions of homes, it is also the only thermometer manufactured in the United States.

Exergen Corporation is recognized worldwide as an innovator and leading manufacturer of patented infrared thermometers, scanners, sensors and controls. The company holds more than 60 U.S. patents for non-invasive temperature measurement devices. Its products are used in a wide variety of industrial and medical applications for both professionals and consumers. For additional information, visit

[1] Gail Lee, RN, et al; Accuracy of Temporal Artery Thermometry in Neonatal Intensive Care Infants, in Advances in Neonatal Care,  Vol. 11, No. 1, pp 62-70.